settlement

[set-l-muh nt]

noun


Origin of settlement

First recorded in 1620–30; settle1 + -ment
Related formsnon·set·tle·ment, nouno·ver·set·tle·ment, nounpre·set·tle·ment, nounre·set·tle·ment, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for settlement-house

settlement

noun

the act or state of settling or being settled
the establishment of a new region; colonization
a place newly settled; colony
a collection of dwellings forming a community, esp on a frontier
a community formed by members of a group, esp of a religious sect
a public building used to provide educational and general welfare facilities for persons living in deprived areas
a subsidence of all or part of a structure
  1. the payment of an outstanding account, invoice, charge, etc
  2. (as modifier)settlement day
an adjustment or agreement reached in matters of finance, business, etc
law
  1. a conveyance, usually to trustees, of property to be enjoyed by several persons in succession
  2. the deed or other instrument conveying such property
  3. the determination of a dispute, etc, by mutual agreement without resorting to legal proceedings
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for settlement-house

settlement

n.

1620s, "act of fixing or steadying;" from settle (v.) + -ment. Meaning "a colony," especially a new one, "tract of country newly developed" is attested from 1690s; that of "small village on the frontier" is from 1827, American English. Sense of "payment of an account" is from 1729; legal sense "a settling of arrangements" (of divorce, property transfer, etc.) is from 1670s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper