setup

[ set-uhp ]
/ ˈsɛtˌʌp /

noun

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Origin of setup

First recorded in 1600–10; noun use of verb phrase set up

usage note for setup

See login.

Definition for setup (2 of 2)

set-up
[ set-uhp ]
/ ˈsɛtˌʌp /

noun

Surveying.
  1. station (def. 14a).
  2. a surveying instrument precisely positioned for observations from a station.
  3. a gap between the end of a chain or tape being used for a measurement and the point toward which it is laid.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for setup

British Dictionary definitions for setup

set up

verb (adverb, mainly tr)

noun setup

adjective set-up

physically well-built
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with setup

set up

1

Place in an upright position, as in I keep setting up this lamp but it won't stay up. [c. 1200]

2

Elevate, raise; also, put in a position of authority or power, as in They set him up as their leader. [Late 1300s]

3

Put oneself forward, claim to be, as in He set himself up as an authority on the banking system. [Mid-1800s]

4

Assemble, erect, make ready for use, as in They set up the sound system last night. [c. 1200]

5

Establish, found, as in They set up a new charity for the homeless. [Early 1400s]

6

Establish in business by providing capital or other backing, as in His father set her up in a new dental practice. [First half of 1500s]

7

Treat someone to drinks, pay for drinks, as in Please let us set you up tonight. [Colloquial; late 1800s]

8

Stimulate or exhilarate, as in That victory really set up our team. [c. 1600]

9

Lay plans for, as in I think they set up the kidnapping months ago. [First half of 1900s]

10

Prepare someone for a deception or trickery or joke, as in They set up their victim for the usual real estate scam, or Her friends set her up so that she was the only person in costume. [Mid-1900s]

11

Cause, bring about, as in The new taxes set up howls of protest. [Mid-1800s]

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.