shaddock

[ shad-uhk ]

noun

Origin of shaddock

1
1690–1700; named after Captain Shaddock, 17th-century Englishman who brought the seed to the West Indies from the East Indies

Words Nearby shaddock

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How to use shaddock in a sentence

  • Nelson met with two fine shaddock-trees which he had planted in 1777: they were full of fruit but not ripe.

  • A fig-tree was in a very thriving way, as were two vines, a pineapple plant, and some slips of a shaddock-tree.

  • Iced shaddock pulp, flavored with Maraschino, is an excellent introduction to creamed chicken.

    Suppers | Paul Pierce
  • Grapefruit, also known as shaddock, is a large, pale-yellow fruit belonging to the citrus group.

    Woman's Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 5 | Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences
  • Then all was silence as soon as the rustling and crackling of cane and the heavy shaddock-like foliage had ceased.

    Hunting the Skipper | George Manville Fenn

British Dictionary definitions for shaddock

shaddock

/ (ˈʃædək) /


noun
  1. another name for pomelo

Origin of shaddock

1
C17: named after Captain Shaddock, who brought its seed from the East Indies to Jamaica in 1696

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012