shed

1
[ shed ]
/ ʃɛd /
||

noun

a slight or rude structure built for shelter, storage, etc.
a large, strongly built structure, often open at the sides or end.

Origin of shed

1
First recorded in 1475–85; variant of shade

Related forms

shed·like, adjective

Definition for shed (2 of 3)

shed

2
[ shed ]
/ ʃɛd /

verb (used with object), shed, shed·ding.


verb (used without object), shed, shed·ding.

noun

Textiles. (on a loom) a triangular, transverse opening created between raised and lowered warp threads through which the shuttle passes in depositing the loose pick.

Origin of shed

2
before 950; Middle English s(c)hed(d)en (v.), Old English scēadan, variant of sceādan; cognate with German scheiden to divide

Related forms

shed·a·ble, shed·da·ble, adjectivenon·shed·ding, adjectiveun·shed·ding, adjective

Definition for shed (3 of 3)

she'd

[ sheed ]
/ ʃid /

contraction of she had.
contraction of she would.

Usage note

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for shed

British Dictionary definitions for shed (1 of 5)

shed

1
/ (ʃɛd) /

noun

a small building or lean-to of light construction, used for storage, shelter, etc
a large roofed structure, esp one with open sides, used for storage, repairing locomotives, sheepshearing, etc
a large retail outlet in the style of a warehouse
NZ another name for freezing works
in the shed NZ at work

verb sheds, shedding or shedded

(tr) NZ to store (hay or wool) in a shed

Derived Forms

shedlike, adjective

Word Origin for shed

Old English sced; probably variant of scead shelter, shade

British Dictionary definitions for shed (2 of 5)

shed

2
/ (ʃɛd) /

verb sheds, shedding or shed (mainly tr)


noun

Derived Forms

shedable or sheddable, adjective

Word Origin for shed

Old English sceadan; related to Gothic skaidan, Old High German skeidan to separate; see sheath

British Dictionary definitions for shed (3 of 5)

shed

3
/ (ʃɛd) /

verb sheds, shedding or shed

(tr) to separate or divide off (some farm animals) from the remainder of a groupa good dog can shed his sheep in a matter of minutes

noun

(of a dog) the action of separating farm animals

Derived Forms

shedding, noun

Word Origin for shed

from shed ²

British Dictionary definitions for shed (4 of 5)

shed

4
/ (ʃɛd) /

noun

physics a former unit of nuclear cross section equal to 10 –52 square metre

Word Origin for shed

C20: from shed 1; so called by comparison to barn ² because of its smaller size

British Dictionary definitions for shed (5 of 5)

she'd

/ (ʃiːd) /

contraction of

she had or she would

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012