shed

2
[ shed ]
/ ʃɛd /

verb (used with object), shed, shed·ding.

verb (used without object), shed, shed·ding.

noun

Textiles. (on a loom) a triangular, transverse opening created between raised and lowered warp threads through which the shuttle passes in depositing the loose pick.

Idioms for shed

    shed blood,
    1. to cause blood to flow.
    2. to kill by violence; slaughter.

Origin of shed

2
before 950; Middle English s(c)hed(d)en (v.), Old English scēadan, variant of sceādan; cognate with German scheiden to divide

SYNONYMS FOR shed

OTHER WORDS FROM shed

shed·a·ble, shed·da·ble, adjectivenon·shed·ding, adjectiveun·shed·ding, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for shed blood (1 of 4)

shed1
/ (ʃɛd) /

noun

a small building or lean-to of light construction, used for storage, shelter, etc
a large roofed structure, esp one with open sides, used for storage, repairing locomotives, sheepshearing, etc
a large retail outlet in the style of a warehouse
NZ another name for freezing works
in the shed NZ at work

verb sheds, shedding or shedded

(tr) NZ to store (hay or wool) in a shed

Derived forms of shed

shedlike, adjective

Word Origin for shed

Old English sced; probably variant of scead shelter, shade

British Dictionary definitions for shed blood (2 of 4)

shed2
/ (ʃɛd) /

verb sheds, shedding or shed (mainly tr)

noun

Derived forms of shed

shedable or sheddable, adjective

Word Origin for shed

Old English sceadan; related to Gothic skaidan, Old High German skeidan to separate; see sheath

British Dictionary definitions for shed blood (3 of 4)

shed3
/ (ʃɛd) /

verb sheds, shedding or shed

(tr) to separate or divide off (some farm animals) from the remainder of a groupa good dog can shed his sheep in a matter of minutes

noun

(of a dog) the action of separating farm animals

Derived forms of shed

shedding, noun

Word Origin for shed

from shed ²

British Dictionary definitions for shed blood (4 of 4)

shed4
/ (ʃɛd) /

noun

physics a former unit of nuclear cross section equal to 10 –52 square metre

Word Origin for shed

C20: from shed 1; so called by comparison to barn ² because of its smaller size
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with shed blood

shed blood

Also, spill blood. Wound or kill someone, especially violently. For example, It was a bitter fight but fortunately no blood was shed, or A great deal of blood has been spilled in this family feud. Both of these terms allude to causing blood to flow and fall on the ground. The first dates from the 1200s. The variant amplifies the verb spill, which from about 1300 to 1600 by itself meant “slay” or “kill”; it was first recorded about 1125.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.