shive

1
[ shahyv ]
/ ʃaɪv /

noun

a sliver or fragment; splinter.
a thin plug, as of wood or cork, for stopping the bunghole of a cask or the mouth of a bottle.

Origin of shive

1
1175–1225; Middle English; cognate with German Scheibe, Old Norse skīfa; akin to sheave2

Definition for shive (2 of 2)

shive

2
[ shiv, shahyv ]
/ ʃɪv, ʃaɪv /

noun

a splinter or fragment of the husk of flax, hemp, etc.

Origin of shive

2
1475–85; earlier scyfe; cognate with dialectal Dutch schif, Middle Dutch scheve, German Schebe; akin to shiver2
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for shive

  • Pray you, sit down with us, Mr Ferris,” said she; “we shall not lack a shive for you.

    Robin Tremayne|Emily Sarah Holt

British Dictionary definitions for shive

shive

/ (ʃaɪv) /

noun

a flat cork or bung for wide-mouthed bottles
an archaic word for slice

Word Origin for shive

C13: from Middle Dutch or Middle Low German schīve; see sheave 1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for shive

shive


n.

early 13c., "slice of bread; thin piece cut off," perhaps from an unrecorded Old English *scifa, cognate with Old Saxon sciva, Middle Dutch schive, Dutch schijf, Old High German sciba, German Scheibe; see skive (v.1). From 1869 as "thin, flat cork for a bottle."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper