siddur

[Sephardic Hebrew see-door; Ashkenazic Hebrew si-duhr, si-door; English sid-er]
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noun, plural sid·du·rim [Sephardic Hebrew see-doo-reem; Ashkenazic Hebrew si-doo-rim] /Sephardic Hebrew si duˈrim; Ashkenazic Hebrew sɪˈdʊ rɪm/, English sid·durs. Hebrew.

a Jewish prayer book designed for use chiefly on days other than festivals and holy days; a daily prayer book.

Compare mahzor.

Origin of siddur

siddūr literally, arrangement
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for siddur

Contemporary Examples of siddur

  • I urge my colleagues to pick up the siddur and heed its words as disciples of Aaron the kohen.

    The Daily Beast logo
    What Siddur Do They Use?

    Rabbi Jonah Geffen

    December 11, 2013

  • And I am left wondering, when the Conservative leadership prays, what siddur do they use?

    The Daily Beast logo
    What Siddur Do They Use?

    Rabbi Jonah Geffen

    December 11, 2013

  • If the mood strikes you, you are welcome to pick up a copy of our siddur and pray with us.

  • I usually prefer the regular, at times monotonous, routines of prayer, using the siddur.

    The Daily Beast logo
    Not Ready to Give Up the Battle

    Shlomi Daskal

    March 28, 2012


British Dictionary definitions for siddur

siddur

noun plural -durim (-duːˈriːm) or -durs

Judaism the Jewish prayer book

Word Origin for siddur

literally: order
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012