sidetrack

[ sahyd-trak ]
/ ˈsaɪdˌtræk /

verb (used with or without object)

to move from the main track to a siding, as a train.
to move or distract from the main subject or course.

noun

any railroad track, other than a siding, auxiliary to the main track.

Origin of sidetrack

An Americanism dating back to 1825–35; side1 + track
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for sidetrack

British Dictionary definitions for sidetrack

sidetrack

/ (ˈsaɪdˌtræk) /

verb

to distract or be distracted from a main subject or topic

noun

US and Canadian a railway siding
the act or an instance of sidetracking; digression
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for sidetrack

sidetrack


n.

also side-track, "railway siding," 1835, from side (adj.) + track (n.). The verb meaning "to move (a train car) onto a sidetrack" is from 1874; figurative sense of "to divert from the main purpose" is attested from 1881. Related: Sidetracked.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper