Sienkiewicz

[ shen-kye-vich; English shen-kyey-vich ]

noun
  1. Hen·ryk [hen-rik], /ˈhɛn rɪk/, 1846–1916, Polish novelist: Nobel Prize 1905.

Words Nearby Sienkiewicz

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2023

How to use Sienkiewicz in a sentence

  • As we bowled along in pursuit the scene reminded me of descriptions in the novels of Sienkiewicz or Erckmann-Chatrian.

    War in the Garden of Eden | Kermit Roosevelt
  • Sienkiewicz himself regards Children of the Soil as his favourite, although he is "not prepared to say just why."

    Essays on Modern Novelists | William Lyon Phelps
  • If some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested, what shall we do with Sienkiewicz?

    Essays on Modern Novelists | William Lyon Phelps
  • Before beginning to write, Sienkiewicz reads all the authorities and documentary evidence he can find.

    Essays on Modern Novelists | William Lyon Phelps
  • In power of description on a large scale, Sienkiewicz seems to take a place among the world's great masters of fiction.

    Essays on Modern Novelists | William Lyon Phelps

British Dictionary definitions for Sienkiewicz

Sienkiewicz

/ (Polish ʃɛŋˈkjɛvitʃ) /


noun
  1. Henryk (ˈxɛnrik). 1846–1916, Polish novelist. His best-known works are Quo Vadis? (1896), set in Nero's Rome, and the war trilogy With Fire and Sword (1884), The Deluge (1886), and Pan Michael (1888), set in 17th-century Poland: Nobel prize for literature 1905

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012