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simony

[ sahy-muh-nee, sim-uh- ]

noun

  1. the making of profit out of sacred things.
  2. the sin of buying or selling ecclesiastical preferments, benefices, etc.


simony

/ ˈsaɪmənɪ /

noun

  1. Christianity the practice, now usually regarded as a sin, of buying or selling spiritual or Church benefits such as pardons, relics, etc, or preferments


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Derived Forms

  • ˈsimonist, noun
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Other Words From

  • simon·ist noun
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Word History and Origins

Origin of simony1

First recorded in 1175–1225; Middle English simonie, from Late Latin simōnia; so called from Simon Magus, who tried to purchase apostolic powers; Simon ( def 5 ), -y 3
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Word History and Origins

Origin of simony1

C13: from Old French simonie, from Late Latin sīmōnia, from the name of Simon Magus
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Example Sentences

I should have told him that in my opinion his attitude was simony—rank simony, and let it go at that.

But simony, or the sale of ecclesiastical benefices, was a still more alarming evil to the mind of Gregory.

It was not merely simony; it was as to who should be the supreme master of Germany and Italy, the emperor or the pope.

But enough deeds of immorality, tyranny, ambition and simony were found proved to justify the severest judgment.

He could not understand the selling of livings in England, and asked if it was not simony.

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SimonsonSimon Zelotes