simulate

[ verb sim-yuh-leyt; adjective sim-yuh-lit, -leyt ]
/ verb ˈsɪm yəˌleɪt; adjective ˈsɪm yə lɪt, -ˌleɪt /

verb (used with object), sim·u·lat·ed, sim·u·lat·ing.

to create a simulation, likeness, or model of (a situation, system, or the like): to simulate crisis conditions.
to make a pretense of; feign: to simulate knowledge.
to assume or have the appearance or characteristics of: He simulated the manners of the rich.

adjective

Archaic. simulated.

QUIZZES

PRACTICE SOME ESCAPISM WITH THIS WORD OF THE DAY QUIZ!

We salute you if you remember all the doovers from Word of the Day between May 25 and May 31!
Question 1 of 7
salute

Origin of simulate

1400–50; late Middle English (adj.) < Latin simulātus (past participle of simulāre), equivalent to simul- (variant of simil-, base of similis similar) + -ātus -ate1

OTHER WORDS FROM simulate

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for simulated

British Dictionary definitions for simulated (1 of 2)

simulated
/ (ˈsɪmjʊˌleɪtɪd) /

adjective

(of fur, leather, pearls, etc) being an imitation of the genuine article, usually made from cheaper material
(of actions, qualities, emotions, etc) imitated; feigned

British Dictionary definitions for simulated (2 of 2)

simulate

verb (ˈsɪmjʊˌleɪt) (tr)

to make a pretence of; feignto simulate anxiety
to reproduce the conditions of (a situation, etc), as in carrying out an experimentto simulate weightlessness
to assume or have the appearance of; imitate

adjective (ˈsɪmjʊlɪt, -ˌleɪt)

archaic assumed or simulated

Derived forms of simulate

simulative, adjectivesimulatively, adverb

Word Origin for simulate

C17: from Latin simulāre to copy, from similis like
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012