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sinigrin

[ sin-i-grin ]
/ ˈsɪn ɪ grɪn /
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noun Chemistry.
a glucosinolate found in certain plants of the mustard family, including black mustard, broccoli, Brussels sprout, and horseradish: the pungent taste and aroma released from the crushed sinigrin-rich seeds or plant tissue are valued as insect deterrents as well as culinary enhancers.
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Also called potassium myronate.

Origin of sinigrin

First recorded in 1875–80; from New Latin Sin(āpis n)igra, a former taxonomic name for black mustard (from Latin sināpis “mustard”) + nigra, feminine singular adjective of niger “black”) + -in see origin at sinapine, Negro) + -in2
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022
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