slue

1

or slew

[sloo]
|

verb (used with object), slued, slu·ing.

to turn (a mast or other spar) around on its own axis, or without removing it from its place.
to swing around.

verb (used without object), slued, slu·ing.

to turn about; swing around.

noun

the act of sluing.
a position slued to.

Origin of slue

1
First recorded in 1760–70; origin uncertain

slue

2
[sloo]

noun Informal.

slue

3
[sloo]

noun

slew

2

or slue

[sloo]

noun Informal.

a large number or quantity: a whole slew of people.

Origin of slew

2
1830–40, Americanism; < Irish sluagh crowd, throng, army, host
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for slues

Historical Examples of slues

  • He has dropped it now, and he slues his gun into position—but with one arm only!


British Dictionary definitions for slues

slue

1

noun, verb

a variant spelling (esp US) of slew 2

slue

2

noun

a variant spelling of slough 1 (def. 2)

slue

3

noun

US informal a variant spelling of slew 4

slew

1

verb

the past tense of slay

slew

2

esp US slue

verb

to twist or be twisted sideways, esp awkwardlyhe slewed around in his chair
nautical to cause (a mast) to rotate in its step or (of a mast) to rotate in its step

noun

the act of slewing

Word Origin for slew

C18: of unknown origin

slew

3

noun

a variant spelling (esp US) of slough 1 (def. 2)

slew

4

slue

noun

informal, mainly US and Canadian a great number or amount; a lot

Word Origin for slew

C20: from Irish Gaelic sluagh; related to Old Irish slōg army
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for slues

slew

n.1

"swampy place," 1708, North American variant of slough.

slew

v.

"to turn, swing, twist," 1834, earlier slue (1769), a nautical word, of unknown origin. Slewed (1801) is old nautical slang for "drunk." Slew-foot "clumsy person who walks with feet turned out" is from 1896.

slew

n.2

"large number," 1839, from Irish sluagh "a host, crowd, multitude," from Celtic and Balto-Slavic *sloug- "help, service" (see slogan).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper