Nearby words

  1. slink,
  2. slink away,
  3. slinky,
  4. slinter,
  5. sliotar,
  6. slip a cog,
  7. slip carriage,
  8. slip casting,
  9. slip flow,
  10. slip form

Idioms

Origin of slip

1
1250–1300; (v.) Middle English slippen < Middle Dutch slippen; cognate with Old High German slipfen; (noun) late Middle English slippe, derivative of or akin to the v.; compare Old High German slipf a sliding, slipping, error; akin to slipper2

SYNONYMS FOR slip
1, 2. slither. See slide. 11. err, blunder. 35. error, fault. See mistake.

Related formsslip·less, adjectiveslip·ping·ly, adverb

slip

2
[slip]

noun

a small paper form on which information is noted: a withdrawal slip.
a piece suitable for propagation cut from a plant; scion or cutting.
any long, narrow piece or strip, as of wood, paper, or land.
a young person, especially one of slender form: a mere slip of a girl.
a long seat or narrow pew in a church.
Bookbinding. one of the ends of a band, extending at the sides of a book after sewing.

verb (used with object), slipped, slip·ping.

to take slips or cuttings from (a plant).
to take (a part), as a slip from a plant.

Origin of slip

2
1400–50; late Middle English slippe < Middle Dutch slippe flap (of a piece of clothing)

slip

3
[slip]

noun

Ceramics. a clay solution of creamy consistency for coating or decorating biscuit.
a glass-bearing liquid fired onto steel as a cladding, as in making enamelware.

Origin of slip

3
before 1000; Middle English slyppe, Old English slype semiliquid mass; cf. slop1, cowslip, oxslip

slip

4
[slip]

noun Architecture.

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for slip


British Dictionary definitions for slip

slip

1

verb slips, slipping or slipped

to move or cause to move smoothly and easily
(tr) to place, insert, or convey quickly or stealthily
(tr) to put on or take off easily or quicklyto slip on a sweater
(intr) to lose balance and slide unexpectedlyhe slipped on the ice
to let loose or be let loose
to be released from (something); escape
(tr) to let go (mooring or anchor lines) over the side
(when intr, often foll by from or out of) to pass out of (the mind or memory)
(tr) to overlook, neglect, or missto slip an opportunity
(intr) to move or pass swiftly or unperceivedto slip quietly out of the room
(intr sometimes foll by up) to make a mistake
Also: sideslip to cause (an aircraft) to slide sideways or (of an aircraft) to slide sideways
(intr) to decline in health, mental ability, etc
(intr) (of an intervertebral disc) to become displaced from the normal position
(tr) to dislocate (a bone)
(of animals) to give birth to (offspring) prematurely
(tr) to pass (a stitch) from one needle to another without knitting it
  1. (tr)to operate (the clutch of a motor vehicle) so that it partially disengages
  2. (intr)(of the clutch of a motor vehicle) to fail to engage, esp as a result of wear
let slip
  1. to allow to escape
  2. to say unintentionally
slip one over on slang to hoodwink or trick

noun

the act or an instance of slipping
a mistake or oversighta slip of the pen
a moral lapse or failing
a woman's sleeveless undergarment, worn as a lining for and to give support to a dress
US and Canadian a narrow space between two piers in which vessels may dock
a kind of dog lead that allows for the quick release of the dog
a small block of hard steel of known thickness used for measurement, usually forming one of a set
the ratio between output speed and input speed of a transmission device when subtracted from unity, esp of a drive belt or clutch that is not transmitting full power
cricket
  1. the position of the fielder who stands a little way behind and to the offside of the wicketkeeper
  2. the fielder himself
the relative movement of rocks along a fault plane
a landslide, esp one blocking a road or railway line
metallurgy crystallog the deformation of a metallic crystal caused when one part glides over another part along a plane
the deviation of a propeller from its helical path through a fluid, expressed as the difference between its actual forward motion and its theoretical forward motion in one revolution
another name for sideslip (def. 1)
give someone the slip to elude or escape from someone
See also slip up

Derived Formsslipless, adjective

Word Origin for slip

C13: from Middle Low German or Dutch slippen

noun

a narrow piece; strip
a small piece of papera receipt slip
a part of a plant that, when detached from the parent, will grow into a new plant; cutting; scion
a young slender persona slip of a child
dialect a young pig
printing
  1. a long galley
  2. a less common name for a galley proof
mainly US a pew or similar long narrow seat
a small piece of abrasive material of tapering section used in honing

verb slips, slipping or slipped

(tr) to detach (portions of stem, etc) from (a plant) for propagation

Word Origin for slip

C15: probably from Middle Low German, Middle Dutch slippe to cut, strip

noun

clay mixed with water to a creamy consistency, used for decorating or patching a ceramic piece

Word Origin for slip

Old English slyppe slime; related to Norwegian slipa slime on fish; see slop 1

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for slip
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with slip

slip

In addition to the idioms beginning with slip

  • slip a cog
  • slip of the lip
  • slip one's mind
  • slip out
  • slip something over on
  • slip through one's fingers
  • slip up

also see:

  • give the slip
  • let slip
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.