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sol

1
[sohl]
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noun Music.
  1. the syllable used for the fifth tone of a diatonic scale.
  2. (in the fixed system of solmization) the tone G.
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Also so.
Compare sol-fa(def 1).

Origin of sol

1
1275–1325; Middle English < Latin solve; see gamut

sol

2
[sohl, sol]
noun
  1. a former coin and money of account of France, the 20th part of a livre and equal to 12 deniers: originally gold, later silver, finally copper, it was discontinued in 1794.
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Also sou.

Origin of sol

2
1575–85; < Old French sol < Late Latin solidus solidus1 compare Italian soldo, Spanish sueldo

sol

3
[sohl, sol; Spanish sawl]
noun, plural sols, Spanish so·les [saw-les] /ˈsɔ lɛs/.
  1. a bronze coin and monetary unit of Peru, equal to 100 centavos. Abbreviation: S.
  2. Also called libra. a former gold coin of Peru.
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Origin of sol

3
1880–85; < American Spanish: sun, Spanish < Latin sōl

sol

4
[sawl, sol]
noun Physical Chemistry.
  1. a fluid colloidal solution.
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Compare aerosol, gel.

Origin of sol

4
shortened form of hydrosol

Sol

[sol]
noun
  1. an ancient Roman god personifying the sun.
  2. the sun, personified by the Romans as a god.
  3. a male given name, form of Solomon.
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-sol

  1. a combining form meaning “soil” of the kind specified by the initial element: spodosol.
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Origin of -sol

From the Latin word solum soil

sol.

Sol.

S.O.L.

or SOL

Slang.
  1. strictly out (of) luck.
  2. Vulgar. shit out (of) luck.
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Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words for sol

star, sunlight, shine, flare, daylight, tan, bask, sunrise, sol, aubade

Examples from the Web for sol

Contemporary Examples of sol

Historical Examples of sol

  • There's one thing I'm going to ask about on my next trip to Sol—if I make one!

    Satellite System

    Horace Brown Fyfe

  • That's Sol Cobb's henhouse and the old rooster is in, judgin' by the signs.

    Thankful's Inheritance

    Joseph C. Lincoln

  • Well, if there is a ghost in that room it'll have its hands full with Sol Cobb.

    Thankful's Inheritance

    Joseph C. Lincoln

  • All days, Christmas or any other, are alike to Sol when there's a dollar to be sighted with a spyglass.

    Thankful's Inheritance

    Joseph C. Lincoln

  • She'd ought to have married Sol Berry when she had the chance.

    The Depot Master

    Joseph C. Lincoln


British Dictionary definitions for sol

sol

1
noun
  1. music another name for soh
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Word Origin for sol

C14: see gamut

sol

2
noun
  1. short for new sol
  2. a former French copper or silver coin, usually worth 12 deniers
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Word Origin for sol

C16: from Old French, from Late Latin: solidus

sol

3
noun
  1. a colloid that has a continuous liquid phase, esp one in which a solid is suspended in a liquid
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Word Origin for sol

C20: shortened from hydrosol

sol

4
noun
  1. astronomy a solar day as measured on the planet Mars, equal to 24.65 hours
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Word Origin for sol

C20: from Latin sōl the sun

Sol

noun
  1. the Roman god personifying the sunGreek counterpart: Helios
  2. a poetic word for the sun
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Sol.

abbreviation for
  1. Also: Solr solicitor
  2. Bible Solomon
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Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for sol

Sol

n.

"the sun personified," mid-15c. (also in Old English), from Latin sol "the sun, sunlight," from PIE *s(e)wol-, variant of root *saewel- "the sun" (cf. Sanskrit suryah, Avestan hvar "sun, light, heavens;" Greek helios; Lithuanian saule; Old Church Slavonic slunice; Gothic sauil, Old English sol "sun," swegl "sky, heavens, the sun;" Welsh haul, Old Cornish heuul, Breton heol "sun;" Old Irish suil "eye").

The PIE element -*el- in the root originally was a suffix and had an alternative form -*en-, yielding *s(u)wen-, source of English sun (n.). French soleil (10c.) is from Vulgar Latin *soliculus, diminutive of sol; in Vulgar Latin diminutives had the full meaning of their principal words.

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S.O.L.

initialism from shit out of luck (though sometimes euphemised), 1917, World War I military slang. "Applicable to everything from death to being late for mess" [R. Lord, "Captain Boyd's Battery A.E.F."]

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

sol in Medicine

sol

(sôl, sōl)
n.
  1. A colloidal dispersion of a solid in a liquid.
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sol.

abbr.
  1. solution
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The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.