Origin of solo

1685–95; < Italian < Latin sōlus alone

Definition for solo (2 of 2)

Solo

[ soh-loh ]
/ ˈsoʊ loʊ /

noun

former name of Surakarta.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for solo

British Dictionary definitions for solo

Word Origin for solo

C17: via Italian from Latin sōlus alone, sole 1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for solo

solo


n.

1690s, "piece of music for one voice or instrument," from Italian solo, literally "alone," from Latin solus "alone" (see sole (adj.)). As an adjective in English from 1712, originally in the non-musical sense of "alone, unassisted;" in reference to aircraft flying from 1909. The verb is first attested 1858 in the musical sense, 1886 in a non-musical sense. Related: Soloed; soloing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper