sorbitol

[ sawr-bi-tawl, -tol ]
/ ˈsɔr bɪˌtɔl, -ˌtɒl /

noun Biochemistry.

a white, crystalline, sweet, water-soluble powder, C6H8(OH)6, occurring in cherries, plums, pears, seaweed, and many berries, obtained by the breakdown of dextrose and used as a sugar substitute for diabetics and in the manufacture of vitamin C, synthetic resins, candy, varnishes, etc.; sorbol.

Nearby words

  1. sorbent,
  2. sorbet,
  3. sorbian,
  4. sorbic,
  5. sorbic acid,
  6. sorbo rubber,
  7. sorbol,
  8. sorbonist,
  9. sorbonne,
  10. sorbose

Origin of sorbitol

First recorded in 1890–95; sorb1 + -itol

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


British Dictionary definitions for sorbitol

sorbitol

/ (ˈsɔːbɪˌtɒl) /

noun

a white water-soluble crystalline alcohol with a sweet taste, found in certain fruits and berries and manufactured by the catalytic hydrogenation of sucrose: used as a sweetener (E420) and in the manufacture of ascorbic acid and synthetic resins. Formula: C 6 H 8 (OH) 6

Word Origin for sorbitol

C19: from sorb + -itol

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medicine definitions for sorbitol

sorbitol

[ sôrbĭ-tôl′, -tōl′ ]

n.

A white, sweetish, crystalline alcohol occurring naturally or prepared synthetically, used as a sugar substitute for people with diabetes.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Science definitions for sorbitol

sorbitol

[ sôrbĭ-tôl′, -tōl′ ]

A white, sweetish, crystalline alcohol found in various berries and fruits or prepared synthetically. It is used as a flavoring agent, a sugar substitute for people with diabetes, and a moisturizer in cosmetics and other products. Chemical formula: C6H14O6.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.