southing

[ sou-th ing ]
/ ˈsaʊ ðɪŋ /

noun

Astronomy.
  1. the transit of a heavenly body across the celestial meridian.
  2. south declination.
movement or deviation toward the south.
distance due south made by a vessel.

Origin of southing

First recorded in 1650–60; south + -ing1

Definition for southing (2 of 2)

Origin of south

before 900; Middle English suth(e), south(e) (adv., adj., and noun), Old English sūth (adv. and adj.); cognate with Old High German sund-
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Examples from the Web for southing

British Dictionary definitions for southing (1 of 3)

southing
/ (ˈsaʊðɪŋ) /

noun

nautical movement, deviation, or distance covered in a southerly direction
astronomy a south or negative declination

British Dictionary definitions for southing (2 of 3)

south
/ (saʊθ) /

noun

adjective

situated in, moving towards, or facing the south
(esp of the wind) from the south

adverb

in, to, or towards the south
archaic (of the wind) from the south
Symbol: S

Word Origin for south

Old English sūth; related to Old Norse suthr southward, Old High German sundan from the south

British Dictionary definitions for southing (3 of 3)

South
/ (saʊθ) /

noun the South

the southern part of England, generally regarded as lying to the south of an imaginary line between the Wash and the Severn
(in the US)
  1. the area approximately south of Pennsylvania and the Ohio River, esp those states south of the Mason-Dixon line that formed the Confederacy during the Civil War
  2. the Confederacy itself
the countries of the world that are not economically and technically advanced

adjective

  1. of or denoting the southern part of a specified country, area, etc
  2. (capital as part of a name)the South Pacific
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with southing

south

see go south.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.