QUIZZES

DO YOU KNOW THIS VOCABULARY FROM "THE HANDMAID'S TALE"?

"The Handmaid's Tale" was required reading for many of us in school. Everyone else has probably watched the very popular and addictive TV show. Do you remember this vocabulary from the book, and do you know what these terms mean?
Question 1 of 10
decorum

Origin of spear

1
before 900; Middle English (noun), Old English spere; cognate with Dutch, German speer

OTHER WORDS FROM spear

spear·er, noun

Definition for spears (2 of 2)

spear2
[ speer ]
/ spɪər /

noun

a sprout or shoot of a plant, as a blade of grass or an acrospire of grain.

verb (used without object)

to sprout; shoot; send up or rise in a spear or spears.

Origin of spear

2
1520–30; variant of spire1, perhaps influenced by spear1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for spears

British Dictionary definitions for spears (1 of 3)

Spears
/ (spɪəz) /

noun

Britney (ˈbrɪtnɪ). born 1981, US pop singer; records include the single "Baby One More Time" (1998) and the album Britney (2001)

British Dictionary definitions for spears (2 of 3)

spear1
/ (spɪə) /

noun

a weapon consisting of a long shaft with a sharp pointed end of metal, stone, or wood that may be thrown or thrust
a similar implement used to catch fish
another name for spearman

verb

to pierce (something) with or as if with a spear

Derived forms of spear

spearer, noun

Word Origin for spear

Old English spere; related to Old Norse spjör spears, Greek sparos gilthead

British Dictionary definitions for spears (3 of 3)

spear2
/ (spɪə) /

noun

a shoot, slender stalk, or blade, as of grass, asparagus, or broccoli

Word Origin for spear

C16: probably variant of spire 1, influenced by spear 1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012