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spectroscope

[ spek-truh-skohp ]

noun

, Optics.
  1. an optical device for producing and observing a spectrum of light or radiation from any source, consisting essentially of a slit through which the radiation passes, a collimating lens, and an Amici prism.


spectroscope

/ ˌspɛktrəˈskɒpɪk; ˈspɛktrəˌskəʊp /

noun

  1. any of a number of instruments for dispersing electromagnetic radiation and thus forming or recording a spectrum See also spectrometer


spectroscope

/ spĕktrə-skōp′ /

  1. Any of various instruments used to analyze the component parts of a sample by separating its parts into a spectrum.
  2. ◆ In a light spectroscope , light is focused into a thin beam of parallel rays by a lens, and then passed through a prism or diffraction grating that separates the light into a frequency spectrum. The intensity of light at different frequencies in the spectrum can be analyzed to determine certain properties of the source of the light, such as its chemical composition or how quickly it is moving.
  3. ◆ In a mass spectroscope , sample ions are beamed through an electric or magnetic field that deflects the ions; the amount of deflection depends on the ratio of their mass to their electric charge. The ion beam is thus split into separate bands; the collection of bands is called the mass spectrum of the sample, and can be analyzed to determine the distribution of ions in the sample. Spectroscopes are also called spectrographs.


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Derived Forms

  • ˌspectroˈscopically, adverb
  • spectroscopic, adjective
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Other Words From

  • spec·tro·scop·ic [spek-tr, uh, -, skop, -ik], spectro·scopi·cal adjective
  • spectro·scopi·cal·ly adverb
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Word History and Origins

Origin of spectroscope1

First recorded in 1860–65; spectro- + -scope
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Word History and Origins

Origin of spectroscope1

C19: from spectro- + -scope ; from French, or on the model of German Spektroskop
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Example Sentences

Using a spectroscope to observe starlight therefore can reveal the chemistry of the stars, exactly what Comte thought impossible.

No sooner was the spectroscope invented than astronomers hastened by its aid to explore the chemical constitution of the sun.

It is, however, from the employment of the micro-spectroscope that the toxicologist is likely to get most assistance.

This atmosphere is shown by the spectroscope to be not unlike that of the earth, although, possibly, more dense.

Two experiments with a spectroscope will help to make clear the meaning of the Fraunhofer lines.

In the spectroscope, Mr. Huggins informs us, the spectrum is peculiar.

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spectroradiometerspectroscopic analysis