stall

1
[ stawl ]
/ stɔl /

noun

verb (used with object)

verb (used without object)

Origin of stall

1
before 900; Middle English; Old English steall; cognate with German Stall, Old Norse stallr; akin to Old English stellan, German stellen to put, place

Related forms

stall-like, adjective

Definition for stalled (2 of 2)

stall

2
[ stawl ]
/ stɔl /

verb (used without object)

to delay, especially by evasion or deception.
Sports. to prolong holding the ball as a tactic to prevent the opponent from scoring, as when one's team has the lead.Compare freeze(def 31).

verb (used with object)

to delay or put off, especially by evasion or deception (often followed by off): He stalled the police for 15 minutes so his accomplice could get away.

noun

a pretext, as a ruse, trick, or the like, used to delay or deceive.
Underworld Slang. the member of a pickpocket's team who distracts the victim long enough for the theft to take place.Compare wire(def 11).
Sports. slowdown(def 3).

Origin of stall

2
1490–1500; earlier stale decoy bird (> Anglo-French estale decoy pigeon), Old English stæl- decoy (in stælhrān decoy reindeer); akin to stall1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for stalled

British Dictionary definitions for stalled (1 of 2)

stall

1
/ (stɔːl) /

noun

verb

Word Origin for stall

Old English steall a place for standing; related to Old High German stall, and stellen to set

British Dictionary definitions for stalled (2 of 2)

stall

2
/ (stɔːl) /

verb

to employ delaying tactics towards (someone); be evasive
(intr) sport, mainly US to play or fight below one's best in order to deceive

noun

an evasive move; pretext

Word Origin for stall

C16: from Anglo-French estale bird used as a decoy, influenced by stall 1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012