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stanch

1

[ stawnch, stanch, stahnch ]

verb (used with object)

  1. to stop the flow of (a liquid, especially blood).
  2. to stop the flow of blood or other liquid from (a wound, leak, etc.).
  3. Archaic. to check, allay, or extinguish.


verb (used without object)

  1. to stop flowing, as blood; be stanched.

noun

  1. Also called flash-lock,. a lock that, after being partially emptied, is opened suddenly to send a boat over a shallow place with a rush of water.

stanch

2

[ stawnch, stahnch, stanch ]

adjective

, stanch·er, stanch·est.

stanch

/ stɑːntʃ; stɔːntʃ /

verb

  1. to stem the flow of (a liquid, esp blood) or (of a liquid) to stop flowing
  2. to prevent the flow of a liquid, esp blood, from (a hole, wound, etc)
  3. an archaic word for assuage


noun

  1. a primitive form of lock in which boats are carried over shallow parts of a river in a rush of water released by the lock

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Derived Forms

  • ˈstanchable, adjective
  • ˈstancher, noun

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Other Words From

  • stancha·ble adjective
  • stancher noun
  • un·stancha·ble adjective

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Word History and Origins

Origin of stanch1

First recorded in 1275–1325; Middle English stanchen, staunchen (verb) < Old French estanchier “to close, stop, slake (thirst),” from Vulgar Latin stanticāre (unattested), equivalent to Latin stant- (stem of stāns, present participle of stāre to stand ) + -icāre causative suffix

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Word History and Origins

Origin of stanch1

C14: from Old French estanchier , from Vulgar Latin stanticāre (unattested) to cause to stand, from Latin stāre to stand, halt

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Example Sentences

Adding other measures to stanch viral spread remains critical, he said.

Only by studying both groups will researchers determine how well vaccines work in stanching the virus’s spread.

They could be a vital component in stanching the spread of the virus — especially in the crucial months before most Americans are vaccinated against the pathogen.

Xavier is also a stanch ally to the LGBTQ community, and I know that he will work with us to ensure health equity for our community.

State and regional water officials are also stepping in, increasingly trying to stanch surface expressions.

A neighbor tried in vain to stanch the bleeding with a towel.

In a swift move to stanch the controversy, Governor Rockefeller demanded the piece be removed.

But Clapper  has also failed fundamentally to stanch the leakage of secrets so emblematic of his tenure atop the community.

The Obama administration began 2009 with an aggressive stimulus to stanch the rapid deterioration of the economy.

This is the first and principal point at which we can stanch the wastage of teaching energy that now goes on.

Here, then, the League and their stanch friends have sustained an unexpected and serious shock.

I tried to stanch it with my waistband, but ineffectually; it relieved him for a moment, and he asked for water.

It seemed too bad that such a stanch dwelling should be given over to neglect, but such is often the case in a new country.

To this I agreed, knowing that Tim was a stanch old soldier, who would not beat a retreat unless we were likely to be overpowered.

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stancestanchion