statute

[ stach-oot, -oo t ]
/ ˈstætʃ ut, -ʊt /

noun

Law.
  1. an enactment made by a legislature and expressed in a formal document.
  2. the document in which such an enactment is expressed.
International Law. an instrument annexed or subsidiary to an international agreement, as a treaty.
a permanent rule established by an organization, corporation, etc., to govern its internal affairs.

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Question 1 of 10
Which of the following words means “to travel or journey, especially to walk on foot”?

Origin of statute

1250–1300; Middle English statut < Old French estatut < Late Latin statūtum, noun use of neuter of Latin statūtus (past participle of statuere to make stand, set up, derivative of status status), equivalent to statū-, verb stem + -tus past participle suffix

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH statute

statue stature statute
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for statute

British Dictionary definitions for statute

statute
/ (ˈstætjuːt) /

noun

  1. an enactment of a legislative body expressed in a formal document
  2. this document
a permanent rule made by a body or institution for the government of its internal affairs

Word Origin for statute

C13: from Old French estatut, from Late Latin statūtum, from Latin statuere to set up, decree, ultimately from stāre to stand
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012