march

1
[ mahrch ]
/ mɑrtʃ /

verb (used without object)

verb (used with object)

to cause to march.

noun

Idioms for march

Origin of march

1
1375–1425; late Middle English marchen < Middle French march(i)er, Old French marchier to tread, move < Frankish *markōn presumably, to mark, pace out (a boundary); see mark1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for steal a march on (1 of 5)

March1
/ (mɑːtʃ) /

noun

the third month of the year, consisting of 31 days

Word Origin for March

from Old French, from Latin Martius (month) of Mars

British Dictionary definitions for steal a march on (2 of 5)

March2
/ (març) /

noun

the German name for the Morava (def. 1)

British Dictionary definitions for steal a march on (3 of 5)

MArch

abbreviation for

Master of Architecture

British Dictionary definitions for steal a march on (4 of 5)

march1
/ (mɑːtʃ) /

verb

noun

Derived forms of march

marcher, noun

Word Origin for march

C16: from Old French marchier to tread, probably of Germanic origin; compare Old English mearcian to mark 1

British Dictionary definitions for steal a march on (5 of 5)

march2
/ (mɑːtʃ) /

noun

Also called: marchland a frontier, border, or boundary or the land lying along it, often of disputed ownership

verb

(intr; often foll by upon or with) to share a common border (with)

Word Origin for march

C13: from Old French marche, from Germanic; related to mark 1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with steal a march on (1 of 2)

steal a march on

Gain an advantage over unexpectedly or secretly, as in Macy's stole a march on their rival department store with their Thanksgiving Day parade. This metaphoric expression comes from medieval warfare, where a march was the distance an army could travel in a day. By quietly marching at night, a force could surprise and overtake the enemy at daybreak. Its figurative use dates from the second half of the 1700s.

Idioms and Phrases with steal a march on (2 of 2)

march

In addition to the idiom beginning with march

  • marching orders, get one's
  • march to a different beat

also see:

  • steal a march on
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.