steep

1
[steep]
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adjective, steep·er, steep·est.

having an almost vertical slope or pitch, or a relatively high gradient, as a hill, an ascent, stairs, etc.
(of a price or amount) unduly high; exorbitant: Those prices are too steep for me.
extreme or incredible, as a statement or story.
high or lofty.

noun

a steep place; declivity, as of a hill.

Origin of steep

1
before 900; Middle English stepe (adj.), Old English stēap; akin to stoop1
Related formssteep·ly, adverbsteep·ness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for steeply

Contemporary Examples of steeply

  • That would be at least another couple percent of GNP, collected ideally through a steeply graduated consumption tax.

    The Daily Beast logo
    America's Investment Crisis

    Jeffrey Sachs

    October 7, 2010

Historical Examples of steeply


British Dictionary definitions for steeply

steep

1

adjective

  1. having or being a slope or gradient approaching the perpendicular
  2. (as noun)the steep
informal (of a fee, price, demand, etc) unduly high; unreasonable (esp in the phrase that's a bit steep)
informal excessively demanding or ambitiousa steep task
British informal (of a statement) extreme or far-fetched
obsolete elevated
Derived Formssteeply, adverbsteepness, noun

Word Origin for steep

Old English steap; related to Old Frisian stāp, Old High German stouf cliff, Old Norse staup

steep

2

verb

to soak or be soaked in a liquid in order to soften, cleanse, extract an element, etc
(tr; usually passive) to saturate; imbuesteeped in ideology

noun

an instance or the process of steeping or the condition of being steeped
a liquid or solution used for the purpose of steeping something
Derived Formssteeper, noun

Word Origin for steep

Old English stēpan; related to steap vessel, cup, Old High German stouf, Old Norse staup, Middle Dutch stōp
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for steeply

steep

adj.

"having a sharp slope," Old English steap "high, lofty," from Proto-Germanic *staupaz (cf. Old Frisian stap, Middle High German *stouf), from PIE *steup- "to push, stick, knock, beat," with derivations referring to projecting objects (cf. Greek typtein "to strike," typos "a blow, mold, die;" Sanskrit tup- "harm," tundate "pushes, stabs;" Gothic stautan "push;" Old Norse stuttr "short"). The sense of "precipitous" is from c.1200. The slang sense "at a high price" is a U.S. coinage first attested 1856. Related: Steeply; steepness.

steep

v.

"to soak in a liquid," late 14c., of uncertain origin, originally in reference to barley or malt, probably cognate with Old Norse steypa "to pour out, throw" (or an unrecorded Old English cognate), from Proto-Germanic *staupijanan. Related: Steeped; steeping.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper