straight-from-the-shoulder

[ streyt-fruh m-thuh-shohl-der ]
/ ˈstreɪt frəm ðəˈʃoʊl dər /

adjective

direct, honest, and forceful in expression; outspoken.

Nearby words

  1. straight-arm,
  2. straight-backed,
  3. straight-chain,
  4. straight-edge,
  5. straight-faced,
  6. straight-laced,
  7. straight-line,
  8. straight-out,
  9. straightaway,
  10. straightedge

shoulder

[ shohl-der ]
/ ˈʃoʊl dər /

noun

verb (used with object)

verb (used without object)

to push with or as if with the shoulder: to shoulder through a crowd.

Origin of shoulder

before 900; (noun) Middle English sholder, s(c)hulder, Old English sculdor; cognate with Dutch schouder, German Schulter; (v.) Middle English shulderen, derivative of the noun

Related formsout·shoul·der, verb (used with object)re·shoul·der, verb (used with object)un·shoul·dered, adjective

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


British Dictionary definitions for straight from the shoulder

shoulder

/ (ˈʃəʊldə) /

noun

verb

Word Origin for shoulder

Old English sculdor; related to Old High German sculterra

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for straight from the shoulder
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Medicine definitions for straight from the shoulder

shoulder

[ shōldər ]

n.

The joint connecting the arm with the torso.
The part of the human body between the neck and upper arm.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Idioms and Phrases with straight from the shoulder

straight from the shoulder

In a direct, forthright manner, as in I'll tell you, straight from the shoulder, that you'll have to do better or they'll fire you. This expression comes from boxing, where it describes a blow delivered with full force. Its figurative use dates from the late 1800s.

shoulder

In addition to the idiom beginning with shoulder

  • shoulder to shoulder

also see:

  • broad shoulders
  • chip on one's shoulder
  • cold shoulder
  • cry on someone's shoulder
  • good head on one's shoulders
  • head and shoulders above
  • on one's shoulders
  • put one's shoulder to the wheel
  • rub elbows (shoulders) with
  • shrug one's shoulders
  • square one's shoulders
  • straight from the shoulder
  • weight of the world on one's shoulders
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.