strand

1
[ strand ]
/ strænd /

verb (used with object)

to drive or leave (a ship, fish, etc.) aground or ashore: The receding tide stranded the whale.
(usually used in the passive) to bring into or leave in a helpless position: He was stranded in the middle of nowhere.

verb (used without object)

to be driven or left ashore; run aground.
to be halted or struck by a difficult situation: He stranded in the middle of his speech.

noun

the land bordering the sea, a lake, or a river; shore; beach.

Nearby words

  1. strake,
  2. stralsund,
  3. stramash,
  4. stramineous,
  5. stramonium,
  6. strand line,
  7. strand wolf,
  8. strand, mark,
  9. strand, paul,
  10. stranded

Origin of strand

1
before 1000; Middle English (noun), Old English; cognate with Dutch strand, German Strand, Old Norse strǫnd; akin to strew

strand

2
[ strand ]
/ strænd /

noun

verb (used with object)

to form (a rope, cable, etc.) by twisting strands together.
to break one or more strands of (a rope).

Origin of strand

2
First recorded in 1490–1500; origin uncertain

Related formsstrand·less, adjective

Strand

[ strand ]
/ strænd /

noun

Mark,1934–2014, U.S. poet, born in Canada: U.S. poet laureate 1990–91.
Paul,1890–1976, U.S. photographer and documentary-film producer.
the, a street parallel to the Thames, in W central London, England: famous for hotels and theaters.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for strand


British Dictionary definitions for strand

strand

1
/ (strænd) /

verb

to leave or drive (ships, fish, etc) aground or ashore or (of ships, fish, etc) to be left or driven ashore
(tr; usually passive) to leave helpless, as without transport or money, etc

noun mainly poetic

a shore or beach
a foreign country

Word Origin for strand

Old English; related to Old Norse strönd side, Middle High German strant beach, Latin sternere to spread

noun

a set of or one of the individual fibres or threads of string, wire, etc, that form a rope, cable, etc
a single length of string, hair, wool, wire, etc
a string of pearls or beads
a constituent element in a complex wholeone strand of her argument

verb

(tr) to form (a rope, cable, etc) by winding strands together

Word Origin for strand

C15: of uncertain origin

Strand

/ (strænd) /

noun

the Strand a street in W central London, parallel to the Thames: famous for its hotels and theatres
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for strand
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper