stranger

[ streyn-jer ]
/ ˈstreɪn dʒər /

noun

a person with whom one has had no personal acquaintance: He is a perfect stranger to me.
a newcomer in a place or locality: a stranger in town.
an outsider: They want no strangers in on the club meetings.
a person who is unacquainted with or unaccustomed to something (usually followed by to): He is no stranger to poverty.
a person who is not a member of the family, group, community, or the like, as a visitor or guest: Our town shows hospitality to strangers.
Law. one not privy or party to an act, proceeding, etc.

Origin of stranger

1325–75; Middle English < Middle French estrangier, equivalent to estrange strange + -ier -ier2
SYNONYMS FOR stranger
1, 5 Stranger, alien, foreigner all refer to someone regarded as outside of or distinct from a particular group. Stranger may apply to one who does not belong to some group—social, professional, national, etc.—or may apply to a person with whom one is not acquainted. Alien emphasizes a difference in political allegiance and citizenship from that of the country in which one is living. Foreigner emphasizes a difference in language, customs, and background.
Related formsstran·ger·like, adjective

Definition for stranger (2 of 3)

strange

[ streynj ]
/ streɪndʒ /

adjective, strang·er, strang·est.

adverb

in a strange manner.

Origin of strange

1250–1300; Middle English < Old French estrange < Latin extrāneus; see extraneous
SYNONYMS FOR strange
1 bizarre, singular, abnormal, anomalous. Strange, peculiar, odd, queer refer to that which is out of the ordinary. Strange implies that the thing or its cause is unknown or unexplained; it is unfamiliar and unusual: a strange expression. That which is peculiar mystifies, or exhibits qualities not shared by others: peculiar behavior. That which is odd is irregular or unconventional, and sometimes approaches the bizarre: an odd custom. Queer sometimes adds to odd the suggestion of something abnormal and eccentric: queer in the head.
6 aloof.
Related formsstrange·ly, adverbun·strange, adjectiveun·strange·ly, adverbun·strange·ness, noun

Definition for stranger (3 of 3)

Stranger, The


noun

(French L'Étranger), a novel (1942) by Albert Camus.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for stranger

British Dictionary definitions for stranger (1 of 2)

stranger

/ (ˈstreɪndʒə) /

noun

any person whom one does not know
a person who is new to a particular locality, from another region, town, etc
a guest or visitor
(foll by to) a person who is unfamiliar (with) or new (to) somethinghe is no stranger to computers
law a person who is neither party nor privy to a transaction

British Dictionary definitions for stranger (2 of 2)

strange

/ (streɪndʒ) /

adjective

adverb

not standard in a strange manner
Derived Formsstrangely, adverb

Word Origin for strange

C13: from Old French estrange, from Latin extrāneus foreign; see extraneous
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for stranger

strange


adj.

late 13c., "from elsewhere, foreign, unknown, unfamiliar," from Old French estrange (French étrange) "foreign, alien," from Latin extraneus "foreign, external," from extra "outside of" (see extra). Sense of "queer, surprising" is attested from late 14c. Stranger, attested from late 14c., never picked up the secondary sense of the adjective. As a form of address to an unknown person, it is recorded from 1817, American English rural colloquial. Meaning "one who has stopped visiting" is recorded from 1520s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper