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stringendo

[ strin-jen-doh; Italian streen-jen-daw ]
/ strɪnˈdʒɛn doʊ; Italian strinˈdʒɛn dɔ /
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adjective, adverb Music.

(of a musical direction) progressively quickening in tempo.

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Origin of stringendo

1850–55; <Italian, gerund of stringere to tighten <Latin (see strict)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021
  • Fourthly, Mrs. P. scolds the servants stringendo e fortissimo while I am dressing in the morning.

  • The closing bars suggest the stringendo passage and presto bars in the coda of the Scherzo of the "Choral Symphony."

    The Pianoforte Sonata|J.S. Shedlock
  • Accelerando, affrettando (this term implies some degree of excitement also), stringendo, poco a poco animato.

  • Festus derives the word strix stringendo, from the received opinion that they strangle children.

British Dictionary definitions for stringendo

stringendo
/ (strɪnˈdʒɛndəʊ) /

adjective, adverb

music to be performed with increasing speed
Italian, from stringere to compress, from Latin: to draw tight; see stringent
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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