judicial

[joo-dish-uhl]
|

adjective


Origin of judicial

1350–1400; Middle English < Latin jūdiciālis of the law courts, equivalent to jūdici(um) judgment (see judge, -ium) + -ālis -al1
Related formsju·di·cial·ly, adverbju·di·cial·ness, nounnon·ju·di·cial, adjectivenon·ju·di·cial·ly, adverbsem·i·ju·di·cial, adjectivesem·i·ju·di·cial·ly, adverbsub·ju·di·cial, adjectivesub·ju·di·cial·ly, adverbsu·per·ju·di·cial, adjectivesu·per·ju·di·cial·ly, adverbun·ju·di·cial, adjectiveun·ju·di·cial·ly, adverb
Can be confusedjudicial judiciary judicious (see synonym study at judicious)

Synonyms for judicial

1, 2. juridical. 2. forensic.

Synonym study

4. See judicious.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for subjudicial

judicial

adjective

of or relating to the administration of justice
of or relating to judgment in a court of law or to a judge exercising this function
inclined to pass judgment; discriminating
allowed or enforced by a court of lawa decree of judicial separation
having qualities appropriate to a judge
giving or seeking judgment, esp determining or seeking determination of a contested issue
Derived Formsjudicially, adverb

Word Origin for judicial

C14: from Latin jūdiciālis belonging to the law courts, from jūdicium judgment, from jūdex a judge
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for subjudicial

judicial

adj.

late 14c., from Latin iudicalis "of or belonging to a court of justice," from iudicium "judgment, decision," from iudicem (see judge (v.)). Related: Judicially.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper