sulphur

[ suhl-fer ]
/ ˈsʌl fər /

noun

Chiefly British. sulfur(def 1).
Also sulfur. yellow with a greenish tinge; lemon color.

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orchard

Origin of sulphur

variant of sulfur

Definition for sulphur (2 of 2)

Sulphur
[ suhl-fer ]
/ ˈsʌl fər /

noun

a city in SW Louisiana.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for sulphur

British Dictionary definitions for sulphur

sulphur

US sulfur

/ (ˈsʌlfə) /

noun

  1. an allotropic nonmetallic element, occurring free in volcanic regions and in combined state in gypsum, pyrite, and galena. The stable yellow rhombic form converts on heating to monoclinic needles. It is used in the production of sulphuric acid, in the vulcanization of rubber, and in fungicides. Symbol: S; atomic no: 16; atomic wt: 32.066; valency: 2, 4, or 6; relative density: 2.07 (rhombic), 1.957 (monoclinic); melting pt: 115.22°C (rhombic), 119.0°C (monoclinic); boiling pt: 444.674°CRelated adjective: thionic
  2. (as modifier)sulphur springs

Derived forms of sulphur

sulphuric or US sulfuric (sʌlˈfjʊərɪk), adjective

Word Origin for sulphur

C14 soufre, from Old French, from Latin sulfur
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Scientific definitions for sulphur

sulfur

S

A pale-yellow, brittle nonmetallic element that occurs widely in nature, especially in volcanic deposits, minerals, natural gas, and petroleum. It is used to make gunpowder and fertilizer, to vulcanize rubber, and to produce sulfuric acid. Atomic number 16; atomic weight 32.066; melting point (rhombic) 112.8°C; (monoclinic) 119.0°C; boiling point 444.6°C; specific gravity (rhombic) 2.07; (monoclinic) 1.957; valence 2, 4, 6. See Periodic Table.
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