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suppress

[ suh-pres ]
/ səˈprɛs /
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See synonyms for: suppress / suppressed / suppresses / suppressing on Thesaurus.com

verb (used with object)
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Origin of suppress

First recorded in 1375–1425; late Middle English suppressen, from Latin suppressus (past participle of supprimere “to press down”), equivalent to sup- sup- + pressus (see press1)

OTHER WORDS FROM suppress

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use suppress in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for suppress

suppress
/ (səˈprɛs) /

verb (tr)
to put an end to; prohibit
to hold in check; restrainI was obliged to suppress a smile
to withhold from circulation or publicationto suppress seditious pamphlets
to stop the activities of; crushto suppress a rebellion
electronics
  1. to reduce or eliminate (unwanted oscillations) in a circuit
  2. to eliminate (a particular frequency or group of frequencies) in a signal
psychiatry
  1. to resist consciously (an idea or a desire entering one's mind)
  2. to exercise self-control by preventing the expression of (certain desires)Compare repress (def. 3)

Derived forms of suppress

suppresser, nounsuppressible, adjective

Word Origin for suppress

C14: from Latin suppressus held down, from supprimere to restrain, from sub- down + premere to press
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for suppress

suppress
[ sə-prĕs ]

v.
To curtail or inhibit the activity of something, such as the immune system.
To deliberately exclude unacceptable desires or thoughts from the mind.
To reduce the incidence or severity of a condition or symptom, such as a hemorrhage.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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