swoon

[ swoon ]
/ swun /

verb (used without object)

to faint; lose consciousness.
to enter a state of hysterical rapture or ecstasy: The teenagers swooned at the sight of the singing star.

noun

a faint or fainting fit; syncope.

QUIZZES

CAN YOU FEEL THE WEAL WITH THIS WORD OF THE DAY QUIZ?

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weal

Origin of swoon

1250–1300; (v.) Middle English swo(w)nen to faint, orig. as gerund swowening, swoghning act of swooning, ultimately continuing Old English -swōgan (in compounds) to rush, overrun, choke; (noun) Middle English, partly derivative of the v., partly extracted from in (a) swoune, on swoune, alteration of a swoune, aswoune in a swoon, as if equivalent to a a-1 + swoon (noun), but probably continuing Old English āswōgen, past participle of āswōgan to overcome (see a-3), or geswōgen (past participle) senseless, dead

OTHER WORDS FROM swoon

swoon·ing·ly, adverbun·swoon·ing, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for swoon

British Dictionary definitions for swoon

swoon
/ (swuːn) /

verb (intr)

a literary word for faint
to become ecstatic

noun

an instance of fainting
Also (archaic or dialect): swound

Derived forms of swoon

swooning, adjectiveswooningly, adverb

Word Origin for swoon

Old English geswōgen insensible, past participle of swōgan (unattested except in compounds) to suffocate
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012