sycophancy

[sik-uh-fuh n-see, -fan-, sahy-kuh-]
See more synonyms for sycophancy on Thesaurus.com

Origin of sycophancy

1615–25; < Latin sȳcophantia trickery < Greek sȳkophantía dishonest prosecution, equivalent to sȳkophant- (see sycophant) + -ia -y3; see -cy
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for sycophancy

Contemporary Examples of sycophancy

Historical Examples of sycophancy

  • There was no sycophancy on the part of the young man, no patronage on that of the employer.

    Macaria

    Augusta Jane Evans Wilson

  • Much of this sycophancy is due to the poverty of the educated classes.

  • Sycophancy was as acceptable as real regard, since each catered to his vanity.

    The Lady Doc

    Caroline Lockhart

  • The President, however, was growing weary of his own sycophancy.

  • The whole teaching profession is honeycombed with sycophancy.

    Meccania

    Owen Gregory


Word Origin and History for sycophancy
n.

1620s, from Latin sycophantia, from Greek sykophantia, from sykophantes (see sycophant).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper