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syncope

[ sing-kuh-pee, sin- ]
/ ˈsɪŋ kəˌpi, ˈsɪn- /
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noun
Grammar. the contraction of a word by omitting one or more sounds from the middle, as in the reduction of never to ne'er.
Pathology. brief loss of consciousness associated with transient cerebral anemia, as in heart block, sudden lowering of the blood pressure, etc.; fainting.
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Origin of syncope

1350–1400; Middle English <Late Latin syncopē<Greek synkopḗ a cutting short, equivalent to syn-syn- + kop- (stem of kóptein to cut) + feminine noun suffix

OTHER WORDS FROM syncope

syn·cop·ic [sin-kop-ik], /sɪnˈkɒp ɪk/, syn·co·pal, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2023

How to use syncope in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for syncope

syncope
/ (ˈsɪŋkəpɪ) /

noun
pathol a technical word for a faint
the omission of one or more sounds or letters from the middle of a word

Derived forms of syncope

syncopic (sɪŋˈkɒpɪk) or syncopal, adjective

Word Origin for syncope

C16: from Late Latin syncopa, from Greek sunkopē a cutting off, from syn- + koptein to cut
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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