tenement

[ ten-uh-muh nt ]
/ ˈtɛn ə mənt /

noun

Also called tenement house. a run-down and often overcrowded apartment house, especially in a poor section of a large city.
Law.
  1. any species of permanent property, as lands, houses, rents, an office, or a franchise, that may be held of another.
  2. tenements, freehold interests in things immovable considered as subjects of property.
British. an apartment or room rented by a tenant.
Archaic. any abode or habitation.

Origin of tenement

1250–1300; Middle English < Medieval Latin tenēmentum, equivalent to Latin tenē(re) to hold + -mentum -ment
Related formsten·e·men·tal [ten-uh-men-tl] /ˌtɛn əˈmɛn tl/, ten·e·men·ta·ry [ten-uh-men-tuh-ree] /ˌtɛn əˈmɛn tə ri/, adjectiveten·e·ment·ed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for tenement

British Dictionary definitions for tenement

tenement

/ (ˈtɛnəmənt) /

noun

Also called: tenement building (now esp in Scotland) a large building divided into separate flats
a dwelling place or residence, esp one intended for rent
mainly British a room or flat for rent
property law any form of permanent property, such as land, dwellings, offices, etc

Derived Formstenemental (ˌtɛnəˈmɛntəl) or tenementary, adjectivetenemented, adjective

Word Origin for tenement

C14: from Medieval Latin tenementum, from Latin tenēre to hold
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012