tiger

[tahy-ger]
See more synonyms for tiger on Thesaurus.com
noun, plural ti·gers, (especially collectively for 1, 2, 6) ti·ger.
  1. a large, carnivorous, tawny-colored and black-striped feline, Panthera tigris, of Asia, ranging in several subspecies from India and the Malay Peninsula to Siberia: the entire species is endangered, with some subspecies thought to be extinct.
  2. the cougar, jaguar, thylacine, or other animal resembling the tiger.
  3. a person resembling a tiger in fierceness, courage, etc.
  4. a country that is considered to have a tiger economy: Taiwan is one of the four Asian tigers.
  5. an additional cheer (often the word tiger) at the end of a round of cheering.
  6. any of several strong, voracious fishes, as a sand shark.
  7. any of numerous animals with stripes similar to a tiger's.
adjective
  1. noting or relating to a strict parenting style that demands academic excellence and obedience from children, associated especially with East Asians:a tiger mom; tiger parenting.

Origin of tiger

before 1000; Middle English tigre, Old English tīgras (plural) < Latin tīgris, tigris < Greek tígris
Related formsti·ger·like, adjective

Woods

[woo dz]
noun
  1. Eldrick [el-drik] /ˈɛl drɪk/, Tiger, born 1975, U.S. professional golfer.
  2. Lake of the. Lake of the Woods.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words for tiger

cougar, leopard, cub, lynx, feline, cat, carnivore, jaguar

Examples from the Web for tiger

Contemporary Examples of tiger

Historical Examples of tiger

  • Then the chief slid out of a shadow and come at us like a tiger.

  • These attack you—but run—at least the tiger, not the elephant, when you go out after him.

    Weighed and Wanting

    George MacDonald

  • "It was no tiger at all—that was the joke of the thing," said the major.

    Weighed and Wanting

    George MacDonald

  • At one end there was a thong with a loop in it, and it smelled of tiger.

    The Trail Book

    Mary Austin

  • The baron raged like a tiger, and the cottager laid about him like a thresher.

    Maid Marian

    Thomas Love Peacock


British Dictionary definitions for tiger

tiger

noun
  1. a large feline mammal, Panthera tigris, of forests in most of Asia, having a tawny yellow coat with black stripes
  2. (not in technical use) any of various other animals, such as the jaguar, leopard, and thylacine
  3. a dynamic, forceful, or cruel person
    1. a country, esp in E Asia, that is achieving rapid economic growth
    2. (as modifier)a tiger economy
  4. archaic a servant in livery, esp a page or groom
  5. short for tiger moth
  6. Southern African slang a ten-rand note
  7. have a tiger by the tail informal to find oneself in a situation that has turned out to be much more difficult to control than one had expected
Derived Formstigerish or tigrish, adjectivetigerishly, adverbtigerishness, nountiger-like, adjective

Word Origin for tiger

C13: from Old French tigre, from Latin tigris, from Greek, of Iranian origin

Tiger

noun
  1. See TIGR

Woods

1
noun
  1. Lake of the Woods See Lake of the Woods

Woods

2
noun
  1. Tiger, real name Eldrick Woods . born 1975, US golfer: youngest US Masters champion and first Black golfer to win a major championship; winner of the US Masters (1997, 2001–02, 2005), US Open (2000, 2002, 2008), British Open Championship (2000, 2005–06), and the PGA Championship (1999, 2000, 2006-07); in 2001 he became the only player to hold all four major titles at once

woods

pl n
  1. closely packed trees forming a forest or wood, esp a specific one
  2. another word for backwoods (def. 2)
  3. the woodwind instruments in an orchestraSee also wood 1 (def. 8)
  4. neck of the woods informal an area or localitya quiet neck of the woods
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for tiger
n.

Old English tigras (plural), also in part from Old French tigre (mid-12c.), both from Latin tigris "tiger," from Greek tigris, possibly from an Iranian source. The meaning "shriek or howl at the end of a cheer" is recorded from 1845, American English. Tiger's-eye "yellowish-brown quartz" is recorded from 1891.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper