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tightrope

[tahyt-rohp]
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noun
  1. a rope or wire cable, stretched tight, on which acrobats perform feats of balancing.
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verb (used without object), tight·roped, tight·rop·ing.
  1. to walk, move, or proceed on or as on a tightrope: He tightroped through enemy territory.
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verb (used with object), tight·roped, tight·rop·ing.
  1. to make (one's way, course, etc.) on or as on a tightrope.
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Origin of tightrope

First recorded in 1795–1805; tight + rope
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for tightrope

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • Bein' married that a-way, I takes it, is somethin' like walkin' a tightrope.

    Faro Nell and Her Friends

    Alfred Henry Lewis

  • When a performer falls from the tightrope, who remembers all the times he has not failed?

    Jacqueline, Complete

    (Mme. Blanc) Th. Bentzon

  • Should you like to be a juggler, a tightrope walker, or a clown?

  • Father Bright felt as though he had been walking a tightrope for hours.

    The Eyes Have It

    Gordon Randall Garrett

  • There were washed out trails where the ride would be in the nature of tightrope walking.

    The Code of the Mountains

    Charles Neville Buck


British Dictionary definitions for tightrope

tightrope

noun
  1. a rope or cable stretched taut above the ground on which acrobats walk or perform balancing feats
  2. to be in a difficult situation that demands careful and considered behaviour
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Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for tightrope

n.

1801, from tight (adj.) + rope (n.).

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with tightrope

tightrope

see walk a tightrope.

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The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.