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anchorite

Idioms for heel

Origin of heel

1
before 850; Middle English; Old English hēl(a); cognate with Dutch hiel, Old Norse hǣll. See hock1

OTHER WORDS FROM heel

heel·less, adjective

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH heel

heal heel he'll
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

British Dictionary definitions for to heel (1 of 2)

heel1
/ (hiːl) /

noun

verb

Derived forms of heel

heelless, adjective

Word Origin for heel

Old English hēla; related to Old Norse hǣll, Old Frisian hêl

British Dictionary definitions for to heel (2 of 2)

heel2
/ (hiːl) /

verb

(of a vessel) to lean over; list

noun

inclined position from the verticalthe boat is at ten degrees of heel

Word Origin for heel

Old English hieldan; related to Old Norse hallr inclined, Old High German helden to bow
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for to heel

heel
[ hēl ]

n.

The rounded posterior portion of the foot under and behind the ankle.
A similar anatomical part, such as the rounded base of the palm.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Idioms and Phrases with to heel (1 of 2)

to heel

1

Close behind someone, as in The dog started chasing the car but Miriam called him to heel. This expression is used almost solely in reference to dogs. The heel in this idiom, first recorded in 1810, is the person's.

2

Under control or discipline, as in By a series of surprise raids the police brought the gang members to heel. This expression alludes to controlling a dog by training it to follow at one's heels. [Late 1800s]

Idioms and Phrases with to heel (2 of 2)

heel

see Achilles' heel; at someone's heels; bring to heel; cool one's heels; dig in (one's heels); drag one's feet (heels); head over heels; kick up one's heels; on the heels of; out at the elbows (heels); set back on one's heels; show one's heels; take to one's heels; to heel; turn on one's heel.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.