tom

[ tom ]
/ tɒm /

noun

the male of various animals, as the turkey.
a tomcat.

Origin of tom

First recorded in 1755–65; generic use of the male given name Tom

Definition for tom (2 of 10)

Tom

[ tom ]
/ tɒm /

noun

a male given name, form of Thomas.

verb (used without object), Tommed, Tom·ming.

(often lowercase) to act like an Uncle Tom.

Definition for tom (3 of 10)

ToM

or TOM


Definition for tom (4 of 10)

Adams

[ ad-uh mz ]
/ ˈæd əmz /

noun

Definition for tom (5 of 10)

Landry

[ lan-dree ]
/ ˈlæn dri /

noun

Thomas WadeTom, 1924–2000, U.S. football player and coach.

Definition for tom (6 of 10)

Mix

[ miks ]
/ mɪks /

noun

Thomas EdwinTom, 1880–1940, U.S. film actor in westerns.

Definition for tom (7 of 10)

Seaver

[ se-ver ]
/ ˈsɛ vər /

noun

(George) ThomasTomTom Terrific, born 1944, U.S. baseball pitcher.

Definition for tom (8 of 10)

Watson

[ wot-suh n ]
/ ˈwɒt sən /

noun

Definition for tom (9 of 10)

Bradley

[ brad-lee ]
/ ˈbræd li /

noun

Definition for tom (10 of 10)

Clark

[ klahrk ]
/ klɑrk /

noun

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for tom

British Dictionary definitions for tom (1 of 8)

tom

1
/ (tɒm) /

noun

  1. the male of various animals, esp the cat
  2. (as modifier)a tom turkey
  3. (in combination)a tomcat

Word Origin for tom

C16: special use of the shortened form of Thomas, applied to any male, often implying a common or ordinary type of person, etc

British Dictionary definitions for tom (2 of 8)

tom

2
/ (tɒm) /

noun

Australian and NZ a temporary supporting post

Word Origin for tom

from a specialized use of tom 1

British Dictionary definitions for tom (3 of 8)

Adams

1
/ (ˈædəmz) /

noun

a mountain in SW Washington, in the Cascade Range. Height: 3751 m (12 307 ft)

British Dictionary definitions for tom (4 of 8)

Adams

2
/ (ˈædəmz) /

noun

British Dictionary definitions for tom (5 of 8)

Bradley

/ (ˈbrædlɪ) /

noun

A (ndrew) C (ecil). 1851–1935, English critic; author of Shakespearian Tragedy (1904)
F (rancis) H (erbert). 1846–1924, English idealist philosopher and metaphysical thinker; author of Ethical Studies (1876), Principles of Logic (1883), and Appearance and Reality (1893)
Henry . 1845–1923, English lexicographer; one of the editors of the Oxford English Dictionary
James . 1693–1762, English astronomer, who discovered the aberration of light and the nutation of the earth's axis

British Dictionary definitions for tom (6 of 8)

Clark

/ (klɑːk) /

noun

Helen. born 1950, New Zealand Labour politician; prime minister (1999–2008); administrator of the United Nations Development Programme from 2009
James, known as Jim. 1936–68, Scottish racing driver; World Champion (1963, 1965)
Kenneth, Baron Clark of Saltwood. 1903–83, English art historian: his books include Civilization (1969), which he first presented as a television series
William. 1770–1838, US explorer and frontiersman: best known for his expedition to the Pacific Northwest (1804–06) with Meriwether Lewis

British Dictionary definitions for tom (7 of 8)

Watson

/ (ˈwɒtsən) /

noun

James Dewey. born 1928, US biologist, whose contribution to the discovery of the helical structure of DNA won him a Nobel prize for Physiology or Medicine shared with Francis Crick and Maurice Wilkins in 1962
John B (roadus). 1878–1958, US psychologist; a leading exponent of behaviourism
John Christian. 1867–1941, Australian statesman, born in Chile: prime minister of Australia (1904)
Russell. born 1973, British tenor; his albums include The Voice (2001) and Encore (2002)
Tom, full name Thomas Sturges Watson. born 1949, US golfer, won eight major titles: the US Masters (1977, 1981), the US Open (1982), and the British Open (1975, 1977, 1980, 1982, 1983)

British Dictionary definitions for tom (8 of 8)

mix

/ (mɪks) /

verb

noun

See also mix-up

Derived Forms

mixable, adjectivemixability, noun

Word Origin for mix

C15: back formation from mixt mixed, via Old French from Latin mixtus, from miscēre to mix
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medicine definitions for tom

Watson

[ wŏtsən ]
James Dewey Born 1928

American biologist who with Francis Crick proposed a spiral model, the double helix, for the molecular structure of DNA. He shared a 1962 Nobel Prize for advances in the study of genetics.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Science definitions for tom (1 of 2)

Adams

[ ădəmz ]
Walter Sydney 1876-1956

American astronomer who demonstrated that the essential brightness of a star could be calculated by studying its spectrum and who introduced a method for measuring the distance of stars based on their brightness. In 1915 he discovered Sirius B, the first known white dwarf star, and his measurement of the gravitational red shift in the light leaving its surface was accepted as evidence for Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity.

Science definitions for tom (2 of 2)

Watson

[ wŏtsən ]
James Dewey Born 1928

See Note at Rosalind Franklin.

American biologist who, working with Francis Crick, identified the structure of DNA in 1953. By analyzing the patterns cast by x-rays striking DNA molecules, they discovered that DNA has the structure of a double helix, two spirals linked together by bases in ladderlike rungs. For this work Watson and Crick shared with Maurice Wilkins the 1962 Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Idioms and Phrases with tom

Tom


see every tom, dick, and harry; peeping tom.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.