tootle

[toot-l]
See more synonyms for tootle on Thesaurus.com
verb (used without object), too·tled, too·tling.
  1. to toot gently or repeatedly on a flute or the like.
  2. to move or proceed in a leisurely way.
noun
  1. the sound made by tooting on a flute or the like.

Origin of tootle

First recorded in 1810–20; toot1 + -le
Related formstoo·tler, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for tootle

Historical Examples of tootle

  • Naturally I got to make 'em talk and tootle a bit to show 'em orf.

    The War in the Air

    Herbert George Wells

  • "Music, if there's any one to tootle for the ladies," said Roger.

  • "You know I can't get up a bit of tootle about this business," he said.

  • Mrs. Tootle, the flute, is of a romantic turn of mind, doting on moonlight and warbling birds and babbling brooks.

    Bizarre

    Lawton Mackall

  • When a passenger of the foot hove in sight, tootle the horn trumpet to him melodiously at first.


British Dictionary definitions for tootle

tootle

1
verb
  1. to toot or hoot softly or repeatedlythe flute tootled quietly
noun
  1. a soft hoot or series of hoots
Derived Formstootler, noun

Word Origin for tootle

C19: from toot 1

tootle

2
verb
  1. (intr) to go, esp by car
noun
  1. a drive, esp a short pleasure trip

Word Origin for tootle

C19: from tootle 1, imitative of the horn of a car
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for tootle
v.

1820, frequentative of toot.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper