Advertisement

Advertisement

View synonyms for torsion

torsion

[ tawr-shuhn ]

noun

  1. the act of twisting.
  2. the state of being twisted.
  3. Mechanics.
    1. the twisting of a body by two equal and opposite torques.
    2. the internal torque so produced.
  4. Mathematics.
    1. the degree of departure of a curve from a plane.
    2. a number measuring this.


torsion

/ ˈtɔːʃən /

noun

    1. the twisting of a part by application of equal and opposite torques at either end
    2. the condition of twist and shear stress produced by a torque on a part or component
  1. the act of twisting or the state of being twisted


torsion

/ tôrshən /

  1. The stress on an object when torque is applied to it.
  2. A mathematical operation in geometry measuring how tightly a plane is twisted.


Discover More

Derived Forms

  • ˈtorsionally, adverb
  • ˈtorsional, adjective

Discover More

Other Words From

  • torsion·al adjective
  • torsion·al·ly adverb

Discover More

Word History and Origins

Origin of torsion1

1375–1425; 1535–45 torsion fordef 1; late Middle English torcion wringing one's bowels < Old French torsion < Late Latin torsiōn- (stem of torsiō ) torment, equivalent to tors ( us ) twisted ( torse ) + -iōn- -ion

Discover More

Word History and Origins

Origin of torsion1

C15: from Old French, from medical Latin torsiō griping pains, from Latin torquēre to twist, torture

Discover More

Example Sentences

The Jacobians also have torsion points, just like elliptic curves, which circle back on themselves under repeated internal addition.

“This simple observation — that torsion points on the elliptic curve are the same as finite orbit points for a certain dynamical system — is what we use in our paper over and over and over again,” said DeMarco.

The two elliptic curves and their torsion points could not be immediately compared because they do not necessarily overlap.

The torsion points are sprinkled on the surfaces of the elliptic curves, but the two curves might have very different shapes.

The new work focuses on the torsion points of those elliptic curves.

Coulomb was the maker of the first instrument for measuring a current, which was known as the torsion balance.

Penaud's machine, relying only on india rubber under torsion, flies for some fifty yards.

On the other hand, the law of torsion could hardly be quite so simple, at all events, to the second order of approximations.

Its free motion differs entirely from that given it by torsion or stress.

The old freighter swung a great circle, its torsion jets blasting desperately in an effort to keep it on an even keel.

Advertisement

Related Words

Word of the Day

axolotl

[ak-suh-lot-l ]

Meaning and examples

Start each day with the Word of the Day in your inbox!

By clicking "Sign Up", you are accepting Dictionary.com Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policies.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement


torsibilitytorsion balance