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totara

/ (ˈtəʊtərə) /
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noun
a tall coniferous forest tree, Podocarpus totara, of New Zealand, having a hard durable wood
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Word Origin for totara

Māori
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

How to use totara in a sentence

  • He went up the Tamar, and at Totara slew five hundred men, and baked and ate three hundred of them.

    The Book of the Bush|George Dunderdale
  • The framework was of the durable totara-wood, the lining of reeds, the outside of dried rushes.

    The Long White Cloud|William Pember Reeves
  • It was a native canoe formed out of the hollow trunk of a totara-tree, and shaped at both ends.

    Forty Thousand Miles Over Land and Water|Lady (Ethel Gwendoline [Moffatt]) Vincent
  • The "totara" is a tree that reminds one of the English yew, but its narrow leaves are longer and of a yellower green.

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