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touchdown

[ tuhch-doun ]
/ ˈtʌtʃˌdaʊn /
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noun

Football. an act or instance of scoring six points by being in possession of the ball on or behind the opponent's goal line.
Rugby. the act of a player whotouches the ball on or to the ground inside his own in-goal.
the act or the moment of landing: the aircraft's touchdown.

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Origin of touchdown

First recorded in 1860–65; touch + down1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for touchdown

British Dictionary definitions for touchdown

touchdown
/ (ˈtʌtʃˌdaʊn) /

noun

the moment at which a landing aircraft or spacecraft comes into contact with the landing surface
rugby the act of placing or touching the ball on the ground behind the goal line, as in scoring a try
American football a scoring play worth six points, achieved by being in possession of the ball in the opposing team's end zoneAbbreviation: TD See also field goal (def. 2)

verb touch down (intr, adverb)

(of a space vehicle, aircraft, etc) to land
rugby to place the ball behind the goal line, as when scoring a try
informal to pause during a busy schedule in order to catch up, reorganize, or rest
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with touchdown

touch down

Land on the ground, as in The spacecraft touched down on schedule. This idiom was first recorded in 1935.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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