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toxoplasmosis

[ tok-soh-plaz-moh-sis ]

noun

, Pathology.
  1. infection with the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, transmitted to humans by consumption of insufficiently cooked meat containing the parasite or by contact with contaminated cats or their feces: the illness produced is usually mild, but in pregnant women may damage the fetus.


toxoplasmosis

/ ˌtɒksəʊplæzˈməʊsɪs /

noun

  1. a protozoal disease characterized by jaundice, enlarged liver and spleen, and convulsions, caused by infection with Toxoplasma gondii


toxoplasmosis

/ tŏk′sō-plăz-mōsĭs /

  1. An infectious disease caused by the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii that can be transmitted by infected humans and animals, especially cats, often by contact with feces. Toxoplasmosis can be a mild illness with fever and swollen lymph nodes, or progress to severe damage to the liver, heart, lungs, and brain. Fetuses that become infected during pregnancy may have congenital blindness and brain damage.


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Derived Forms

  • ˌtoxoˈplasmic, adjective
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Word History and Origins

Origin of toxoplasmosis1

1925–30; < New Latin Toxoplasm ( a ) ( toxoplasma ) + -osis
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Example Sentences

The bug, known as T. gondii, can cause an infection called toxoplasmosis.

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toxoplasmatoy