transfix

[ trans-fiks ]
/ trænsˈfɪks /

verb (used with object), trans·fixed or trans·fixt, trans·fix·ing.

to make or hold motionless with amazement, awe, terror, etc.
to pierce through with or as if with a pointed weapon; impale.
to hold or fasten with or on something that pierces.

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Origin of transfix

1580–90; <Latin trānsfīxus (past participle of trānsfīgere to pierce through), equivalent to trāns-trans- + fīg(ere) to pierce + -sus, variant of -tus past participle suffix

OTHER WORDS FROM transfix

trans·fix·ion [trans-fik-shuhn], /trænsˈfɪk ʃən/, nounun·trans·fixed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for transfix

British Dictionary definitions for transfix

transfix
/ (trænsˈfɪks) /

verb -fixes, -fixing, -fixed or -fixt (tr)

to render motionless, esp with horror or shock
to impale or fix with a sharp weapon or other device
med to cut through (a limb or other organ), as in amputation

Derived forms of transfix

transfixion (trænsˈfɪkʃən), noun

Word Origin for transfix

C16: from Latin transfīgere to pierce through, from trans- + fīgere to thrust in
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012