trap

1
[trap]
||

noun

verb (used with object), trapped, trap·ping.

verb (used without object), trapped, trap·ping.


Nearby words

  1. transvestite,
  2. transylvania,
  3. transylvanian alps,
  4. trantas dot,
  5. tranter,
  6. trap car,
  7. trap cut,
  8. trap door,
  9. trap gun,
  10. trap house

Origin of trap

1
before 1000; Middle English trappe (noun), trappen (v.), Old English træppe (noun), cognate with Middle Dutch trappe (Dutch trap) trap, step, staircase; akin to Old English treppan to tread, German Treppe staircase

SYNONYMS FOR trap
1, 2. T rap , pitfall , snare apply to literal or figurative contrivances for deceiving and catching animals or people. Literally, a trap is a mechanical contrivance for catching animals, the main feature usually being a spring: a trap baited with cheese for mice. Figuratively, trap suggests the scheme of one person to take another by surprise and thereby gain an advantage: a trap for the unwary. A pitfall is (usually) a concealed pit arranged for the capture of large animals or of people who may fall into it; figuratively, it is any concealed danger, error, or source of disaster: to avoid the pitfalls of life. A snare is a device for entangling birds, rabbits, etc., with intent to capture; figuratively, it implies enticement and inveiglement: the temptress' snare.

Related formstrap·like, adjective

trap

2
[trap]

noun

traps, Informal. personal belongings; baggage.

verb (used with object), trapped, trap·ping.

to furnish with or as with trappings; caparison.

Origin of trap

2
1300–50; Middle English trappe (noun), trappen (v.) < ?

trap

3
[trap]

noun Geology.

any of various fine-grained, dark-colored igneous rocks having a more or less columnar structure, especially some form of basalt.

Origin of trap

3
1785–95; < Swedish trapp, variant of trappa stair (so named from the stepped appearance of their outcrops) < Middle Low German trappe. See trap1

Also called traprock.

trap

4
[trap]

noun Scot.

a ladder or ladderlike device used to reach a loft, attic, etc.

Origin of trap

4
1750–60; < Dutch: stepladder; see trap1

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for traps


British Dictionary definitions for traps

traps

pl n

belongings; luggage

Word Origin for traps

C19: probably shortened from trappings

trap

1

noun

a mechanical device or enclosed place or pit in which something, esp an animal, is caught or penned
any device or plan for tricking a person or thing into being caught unawares
anything resembling a trap or prison
a fitting for a pipe in the form of a U-shaped or S-shaped bend that contains standing water to prevent the passage of gases
any similar device
a device that hurls clay pigeons into the air to be fired at by trapshooters
any one of a line of boxlike stalls in which greyhounds are enclosed before the start of a race
a light two-wheeled carriage
a slang word for mouth
golf an obstacle or hazard, esp a bunker
(plural) jazz slang percussion instruments
(usually plural) Australian obsolete, slang a policeman

verb traps, trapping or trapped

(tr) to catch, take, or pen in or as if in a trap; entrap
(tr) to ensnare by trickery; trick
(tr) to provide (a pipe) with a trap
to set traps in (a place), esp for animals
Derived Formstraplike, adjective

Word Origin for trap

Old English træppe; related to Middle Low German trappe, Medieval Latin trappa

trap

2

noun

an obsolete word for trappings (def. 2)

verb traps, trapping or trapped

(tr often foll by out) to dress or adorn
See also traps

Word Origin for trap

C11: probably from Old French drap cloth

trap

3

traprock

noun

any fine-grained often columnar dark igneous rock, esp basalt
any rock in which oil or gas has accumulated

Word Origin for trap

C18: from Swedish trappa stair (from its steplike formation); see trap 1

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for traps
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with traps

trap

see fall into a trap; mind like a steel trap.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.