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tremulant

[ trem-yuh-luhnt ]
/ ˈtrɛm yə lənt /
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adjective
trembling; tremulous.
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Origin of tremulant

1830–40; <Medieval Latin tremulant- (stem of tremulāns) present participle of tremulāre to tremble; see -ant

OTHER WORDS FROM tremulant

un·trem·u·lant, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use tremulant in a sentence

  • Mechanical accessories: swell tremulant, choir tremulant, bellows signal; wind indicator.

    Pulpit and Press|Mary Baker Eddy
  • His tone is all through his nose, and his tenuto is like the tremulant stop on the organ.

  • She stood by the bench, one hand resting on it; she stood all in the tremulant shadow.

British Dictionary definitions for tremulant

tremulant
/ (ˈtrɛmjʊlənt) /

noun
music
  1. a device on an organ by which the wind stream is made to fluctuate in intensity producing a tremolo effect
  2. a device on an electrophonic instrument designed to produce a similar effect

Word Origin for tremulant

C19: from Medieval Latin tremulāre to tremble
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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