tremble

[ trem-buhl ]
/ ˈtrɛm bəl /

verb (used without object), trem·bled, trem·bling.

to shake involuntarily with quick, short movements, as from fear, excitement, weakness, or cold; quake; quiver.
to be troubled with fear or apprehension.
(of things) to be affected with vibratory motion.
to be tremulous, as light or sound: His voice trembled.

noun

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Origin of tremble

First recorded in 1275–1325; Middle English trem(b)len (verb), from Old French trembler, from Vulgar Latin *tremulāre, derivative of Latin tremulustremulous

synonym study for tremble

1. See shake.

OTHER WORDS FROM tremble

trem·bling·ly, adverbun·trem·bling, adjectiveun·trem·bling·ly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for tremble

British Dictionary definitions for tremble

tremble
/ (ˈtrɛmbəl) /

verb (intr)

to vibrate with short slight movements; quiver
to shake involuntarily, as with cold or fear; shiver
to experience fear or anxiety

noun

the act or an instance of trembling

Derived forms of tremble

trembling, adjectivetremblingly, adverbtrembly, adjective

Word Origin for tremble

C14: from Old French trembler, from Medieval Latin tremulāre, from Latin tremulus quivering, from tremere to quake
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012