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trews

[ trooz ]

noun

, (used with a plural verb)
  1. close-fitting tartan trousers, worn especially by certain Scottish regiments.


trews

/ truːz /

plural noun

  1. close-fitting trousers, esp of tartan cloth and worn by certain Scottish soldiers


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Word History and Origins

Origin of trews1

1560–70; < Irish and Scots Gaelic triubhas < Old French trebus breeches
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Word History and Origins

Origin of trews1

C16: from Scottish Gaelic triubhas , from Old French trebus ; see trousers
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Example Sentences

One was a British officer, in the scarlet jacket and tartan trews of a Highland regiment.

A French officer had discharged his pistol by mistake, and he lay on the floor in his scarlet trews.

He wore trews of a tartan which Mr. Lovel, trained in such matters, recognised as that of the house of Atholl.

Macdonald had said to the tailor that if he would make the trews by night in the church he would get a handsome reward.

So he held his trews tight, and let no darkness grow under his feet until he had reached Saddell Castle.

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Trevor-RoperT. rex